Protecting the Snow Leopard from Poachers

A snow leopard in Mongolia. i i

hide captionSnow leopard numbers continue to plummet as a highly lucrative black market demand for their pelts and bones increases.

Fritz Polking, Snow Leopard Trust
A snow leopard in Mongolia.

Snow leopard numbers continue to plummet as a highly lucrative black market demand for their pelts and bones increases.

Fritz Polking, Snow Leopard Trust
Wildlife biologist Bariushaa Munkhtsog is director of the Snow Leopard Trust's Mongolia program

hide captionWildlife biologist Bariushaa Munkhtsog is director of the Snow Leopard Trust's Mongolia program. The program monitors the big cats and their prey, and works with local herding families to offset the economic pressure to poach.

Elizabeth Arnold, NPR
A one-room canvas home for Mongolian herding families. i i

hide captionHerding families who graze their livestock in the Altaj Mountains of northwestern Mongolian live in one-room canvas yurts like this one, which are called "gers" in Mongolia.

Elizabeth Arnold, NPR
A one-room canvas home for Mongolian herding families.

Herding families who graze their livestock in the Altaj Mountains of northwestern Mongolian live in one-room canvas yurts like this one, which are called "gers" in Mongolia.

Elizabeth Arnold, NPR
Erdenbaatar, a Mongolian wildlife ranger, with his wife and daughter i i

hide captionErdenbaatar, a Mongolian wildlife ranger for Snow Leopard Trust, with his wife, Sandileg, and daughter.

Elizabeth Arnold, NPR
Erdenbaatar, a Mongolian wildlife ranger, with his wife and daughter

Erdenbaatar, a Mongolian wildlife ranger for Snow Leopard Trust, with his wife, Sandileg, and daughter.

Elizabeth Arnold, NPR

Snow leopards are among the world's most endangered big cats. An estimated 3,000 to 6,000 remain in the wild. While the predator is protected under several international treaties, snow leopards are rapidly in decline. Poachers can make a small fortune from their pelts, which sell for thousands of dollars on the black market in China and elsewhere.

Mongolian wildlife biologist Munkhtsog (traditonally, Mongolians go by a single name) has been tracking snow leopards for the last 10 years. He says while the leopards are rarely seen, "they mark certain landscapes to communicate with each other, like the language of people."

I traveled by train, plane, jeep and foot across the Gobi desert and up high into the Altaj mountains of Northwestern Mongolia to join Munkhtsog.

As the Mongolian Program director of the International Snow Leopard Trust, Munkhtsog works with local herders to monitor the movements, prey and habitat of snow leopards with the goal of protecting them. The work is difficult as the big cats live in some of the harshest terrain in the world. High in the snowy peaks of the remote Altaj Mountains in northwestern Mongolia, Munkhtsog has taught herders how to track snow leopards from the shallow holes they dig, scent marks they leave on the underside of rocks and scratch marks on trees. By keeping a close watch on the snow leopard population here and in other parts of Central Asia, biologists can determine whether and where they are being illegally killed.

In addition, his organization is working with local herding families to make wool handicrafts sold in Mongolia and in the United States to relieve the economic pressure to poach.

Erdenbaatar, a herder and ranger in northwestern Mongolia's Yammat Valley, has worked with Munkhtsog and the Snow Leopard Trust for several years.

"There are very few of them left in the world, and where there is snow leopard, there is everything," Erdenbaatar says.

Web Resources

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: