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Iran's Jews Mark Hanukkah in Conference's Shadow

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Iran's Jews Mark Hanukkah in Conference's Shadow

Religion

Iran's Jews Mark Hanukkah in Conference's Shadow

Iran's Jews Mark Hanukkah in Conference's Shadow

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6637682/6637683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arash Abaie lights the candles on the second night of Hanukkah as his sister Elham (background) and a friend's child look on. Mike Shuster, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mike Shuster, NPR

Arash Abaie lights the candles on the second night of Hanukkah as his sister Elham (background) and a friend's child look on.

Mike Shuster, NPR

Iran's Jewish population is estimated at about 20,000. That number is tiny compared with Iran's nearly 70 million Muslims, but it's still the largest Jewish population in the Middle East outside of Israel.

This year, the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah began just a few days after the Iranian government held a two-day conference challenging the accepted history of the Holocaust.

NPR's Mike Shuster visited one Jewish family in Tehran as it gathered to celebrate Hanukkah and to talk about how this controversy affects Iran's Jewish community.

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