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Measuring Complexity of Violence in Iraq

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Measuring Complexity of Violence in Iraq

Iraq

Measuring Complexity of Violence in Iraq

Measuring Complexity of Violence in Iraq

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6648921/6648922" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Pentagon's quarterly report to Congress on Iraq documents deteriorating conditions, particularly in Baghdad and Anbar province. While it calls ethnic and sectarian violence the "greatest security threat," the document stops short of terming the violence "civil war."

The report says instead that the situation is more complex than the term "civil war" implies.

Melissa Block talks with Kenneth Pollack of the Brookings Institution, who served on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration.

Pollack is one of the first to propose a plan involving focusing troops on providing security in Baghdad; he has been consulted by the military on his plan.