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Legislation Directs Money to Gulf Coast Restoration

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Legislation Directs Money to Gulf Coast Restoration

Katrina & Beyond

Legislation Directs Money to Gulf Coast Restoration

Legislation Directs Money to Gulf Coast Restoration

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Ecologist Mark Ford of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana steers his boat through the wetlands of Lake Catherine, Louisiana. The state lost more than 200 square miles of wetlands in Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and it has lost almost 2,000 square miles since the 1930s. Adam Hochberg, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Adam Hochberg, NPR

Ecologist Mark Ford of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana steers his boat through the wetlands of Lake Catherine, Louisiana. The state lost more than 200 square miles of wetlands in Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and it has lost almost 2,000 square miles since the 1930s.

Adam Hochberg, NPR

President Bush signs legislation that expands oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, and directs the royalties into restoring the region's wetlands.

Area residents are concerned that the money from the legislation won't reach the coast for years. They'd like to see the billions needed for wetlands restoration start flowing now.

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