The Saga of a Sulfa Drug Pioneer

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The world's first antibiotics were developed in the 1930s in Nazi Germany. The man most responsible was Bayer scientist Gerhard Domagk. He was not a Nazi, and was later prevented from accepting the Nobel Prize. Thomas Hager, author of The Demon Under the Microscope, tells Scott Simon the story.

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The Demon Under the Microscope

From Battlefield Hospitals to Nazi Labs, One Doctor's Heroic Search for the World's First Miracle Drug

by Thomas Hager

Hardcover, 340 pages | purchase

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Title
The Demon Under the Microscope
Subtitle
From Battlefield Hospitals to Nazi Labs, One Doctor's Heroic Search for the World's First Miracle Drug
Author
Thomas Hager

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