Most of U.S. Won't Be Seeing a White Christmas

Because of last week's backlog at the Denver airport, as many as 2,000 mail carriers are working on Christmas Eve to deliver cards and packages in Colorado and Wyoming. Colorado was blanketed with snow, but most of the country will not be seeing a white Christmas this year.

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JACKI LYDEN, host:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Wait. What's that ring-ting-ting-a-ling? As many as 2,000 postal workers have fanned out this Christmas Eve like Santa's elves to get packages to homes around Colorado and Wyoming. They're making Sunday deliveries, hoping to shrink the backlog caused by last week's storms that buried the Rockies.

Turns out the snow this Christmas season seems to have fallen on the Denver Airport. There was also some on the Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon and Washington State and central and northern Wisconsin. Otherwise, Buffalo? No. Duluth? Don't need a sled. But wait. What about a certain Columbia Inn up in Pine Tree, Vermont?

(Soundbite of song, "White Christmas")

Mr. BING CROSBY (Singing): (Singing) And may all your Christmases be white...

LYDEN: Oh, yeah. Those guys always get snow - year after year after year.

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