Is Cloning the Next Step in Cattle Development?

Robert Siegel talks again with D.T. Max, author of The Family that Couldn't Sleep, about Robert Bakewell, the 18th century agriculturalist who introduced stockbreeding methods that changed the quality of Britain's sheep and cattle.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Book Traces Family Suffering from Deadly Insomnia

Author D.T. Max

Author D.T. Max describes himself as a journalist and an essayist. Nancy Pastor hide caption

itoggle caption Nancy Pastor

The Family that Couldn't Sleep traces the fascinating and horrific tale of an Italian family who suffers from a deadly genetic disease called fatal familial insomnia.

People who experience the disease become unable to sleep and can die within a few months. The disease can be traced back in the family more than two hundred years. Robert Siegel talks with the book's author, D.T. Max.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.