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'Dirt' Bombs, Despite Having All the Right Pieces

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'Dirt' Bombs, Despite Having All the Right Pieces

'Dirt' Bombs, Despite Having All the Right Pieces

'Dirt' Bombs, Despite Having All the Right Pieces

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6710436/6710437" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Courteney Cox Arquette stars as a celebrity tabloid editor in Dirt. Ruven Afanador/FX hide caption

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Ruven Afanador/FX

Despite the firestorm of hype over the new FX drama Dirt, the show could use some spiffing up. The show, which stars Courteney Cox Arquette and is executive-produced by her husband, David Arquette, demonstrates how the sum of many great parts can still add up to not-so-great TV.

Dirt is a disaster for many reasons — among them the fact that Cox Arquette is completely miscast as Lucy Spiller, the manipulative editor of a pair of celebrity tabloids. The show squanders a great opportunity to be the dark satire it should have been, offering instead flat writing and an inconsistent tone.

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