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Threatened in Iraq, Professors Open School in Syria
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Threatened in Iraq, Professors Open School in Syria

Middle East

Threatened in Iraq, Professors Open School in Syria

Threatened in Iraq, Professors Open School in Syria
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The faculty is Iraqi — the best and brightest from universities in Baghdad, Mosul and Basra. They led their departments, in medicine, dentistry, computer sciences. But they were targets for assassination, so they packed up and headed for a new life in Syria.

Iraq's loss is Syria's gain. The refugees put their money together and opened The Syrian International University for Sciences and Technology, a campus 20 miles outside the capital. The school is the only one in Syria to offer education in English.

The Iraqi professors — Sunnis, Kurds, Shiites and Christians — are making technocrats out of the children of Syria's middle class.

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