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New Rolls Royce Caters to the Picnic Crowd

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New Rolls Royce Caters to the Picnic Crowd

Business

New Rolls Royce Caters to the Picnic Crowd

New Rolls Royce Caters to the Picnic Crowd

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Rolls Royce is debuting its new Phantom Drophead Coupe. The two-door convertible will cost in the neighborhood of $400,000. The highlight is the large trunk with a door that folds down to create two seats for tailgating.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

As we heard from Anthony, the Detroit auto show is a chance for carmakers from around the world to entice American drivers. In our last word, we look at one effort by an iconic British carmaker. Rolls Royce is debuting its new Phantom Drophead Coupe. The two-door convertible features brushed steel, antiqued wood panels. The highlight is the trunk, or boot as they call it in Britain.

There's space for several picnic baskets and the door of the trunk folds down to create two seats. Rolls Royce, now owned by BMW, is catering to that strange American pastime of tailgate parties. If you want to show up in style, you'll have to fork over $400,000 for the car, plus a few extra bucks for the six pack.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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