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'Football Scouting' Book Finds New Fans

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'Football Scouting' Book Finds New Fans

Sports

'Football Scouting' Book Finds New Fans

'Football Scouting' Book Finds New Fans

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  • Transcript

The out-of-print book Football Scouting Methods, published in 1963, is one of the hottest things going on the Web-driven book resale market. It was written by Steve Belichick, father of New England Patriots' coach Bill Belichick.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business comes just in time for this weekend's college football championship. It is the brisk business being done by an old football book. The book comes from 1963. It does not have the sexiest title: “Football Scouting Methods.” The online bookseller BookFinder.com says it came out of nowhere. The rag is its second most sought after but out-of-print book in 2006. It ranked just behind Madonna's old book, which does have a sexy title: “Sex.”

BookFinder.com's Charlie Hsu chalks up the football book's success to the author's son, Bill Belichick, who's now coach of the hugely successful New England Patriots.

Mr. CHARLIE HSU (BookFinder.com): The book has a very practical scouting method. It's about how to scout for people, how to scout for talent, how to set up your team, how to set up your plays. How-to - how to be your own coach. How to be your own Bill Belichick.

INSKEEP: The book's author is Steve Belichick. He died in late 2005 before he could see the newfound popularity of his work, but after he'd seen his son win a third Super Bowl.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: And that's some of the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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