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Web Site Tracks Birds' Worst Enemies: Cats

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Web Site Tracks Birds' Worst Enemies: Cats

Research News

Web Site Tracks Birds' Worst Enemies: Cats

Web Site Tracks Birds' Worst Enemies: Cats

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6728958/6731063" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Domestic and feral cats kill hundreds of millions of birds each year in the United States. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

It's possible that the number one killer of American birds is a much-beloved, domestic pet.

Experts say outdoor cats may kill hundreds of millions of wild birds each year — but they aren't exactly sure how many.

Now, the American Bird Conservatory is asking pet owners to help count any small animals their household pets kill. When pet owners see a household pet kill a bird, squirrel, or anything else, they can go to the ABC's "Project Predator Watch" Web site and fill in the details.

Bird experts hope the information will indicate whether details like fur color or declawing a cat make a difference for birds. It's possible, however, that the survey results will also indicate good news for cat owners: the cats may also eat creatures like rats, which — for instance — prey on bird eggs.

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