A Man of Letters Inserts Himself Into Sudan Debate Renaissance scholar Eric Reeves had never set foot in Africa. He spent his days teaching the works of Shakespeare and Milton to the young women of Smith College in Massachusetts. But that didn't keep him from getting involved with the humanitarian crisis in Sudan. From his office at Smith, Reeves has becomea leading activist against the genocide.
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A Man of Letters Inserts Himself Into Sudan Debate

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A Man of Letters Inserts Himself Into Sudan Debate

A Man of Letters Inserts Himself Into Sudan Debate

A Man of Letters Inserts Himself Into Sudan Debate

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Renaissance scholar Eric Reeves had never set foot in Africa. He spent his days teaching the works of Shakespeare and Milton to the young women of Smith College in Massachusetts.

But that seeming disconnection didn't keep Reeves from getting involved with the humanitarian crisis in Sudan.

From his office at Smith, Reeves ginned up op-ed pieces and worked the Internet to become, as Karen Brown reports, one of the leading activists against genocide in Sudan.