Film Tracks 'Lost Boys' Lives in America

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Director Christopher Quinn and John Dau. i

Director Christopher Quinn and John Dau, one of the three Sudanese "lost boys" profiled in the film. Bettina Wiesenthal-Birch, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Bettina Wiesenthal-Birch, NPR
Director Christopher Quinn and John Dau.

Director Christopher Quinn and John Dau, one of the three Sudanese "lost boys" profiled in the film.

Bettina Wiesenthal-Birch, NPR
Some of the Sudanese men take their first trip to an American supermarket in a scene from the film.

Some of the Sudanese men take their first trip to an American supermarket in a scene from the film. Newmarket Films hide caption

itoggle caption Newmarket Films

The Second Sudanese Civil War began in 1983, when tensions between Islamic fundamentalists in the north and separatist Christians in the south exploded. Over the next 20 years, an estimated 2 million people died. At least 20,000 children — mostly boys — were separated from their families. They walked thousands of miles from Sudan to refugee camps in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda. In 2001, almost 4,000 of these "lost boys" came to America.

God Grew Tired of Us is a documentary about three of these men. It opens around the country this Friday. In the film, director Christopher Quinn follows Panther Bior, Daniel Pach and John Quinn over a four-year span as they settle into the United States.

Quinn and Dau talk about the new film, which is narrated by Nicole Kidman.

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