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Trees Hit by Beetles May Fuel Town's Buildings

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Trees Hit by Beetles May Fuel Town's Buildings

Technology

Trees Hit by Beetles May Fuel Town's Buildings

Trees Hit by Beetles May Fuel Town's Buildings

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6898791/6898792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Walden High School teacher Phil Anderson holds wood chips that he's about to feed into a woody biomass generator, behind him. The generator powers the building it's housed in, and a greenhouse next door. Kirk Siegler hide caption

toggle caption Kirk Siegler

Walden High School teacher Phil Anderson holds wood chips that he's about to feed into a woody biomass generator, behind him. The generator powers the building it's housed in, and a greenhouse next door.

Kirk Siegler

Ravenous bark beetles have left forests in the West full of ruined trees.

Now, as Kirk Siegler of Aspen Public Radio reports, Walden, Colo., plans to build a generator that would use the beetle-riddled wood to power several buildings owned by the small town.

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