NPR logo

Key Watergate Figure Hunt Dead at 88

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6994661/6994662" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Key Watergate Figure Hunt Dead at 88

Remembrances

Key Watergate Figure Hunt Dead at 88

Key Watergate Figure Hunt Dead at 88

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6994661/6994662" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

E. Howard Hunt, mastermind of the Watergate break-in, has died at 88. Bitter over his treatment, E. Howard Hunt lived his final years in a modest home in Miami. A memoir is due out next month.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

A man whose name became synonymous with the Watergate scandal has died. E. Howard Hunt was a CIA officer who helped plan a Guatemalan coup and the Bay of Pigs invasion before he became a key organizer of the Watergate burglary. Hunt told the Senate committee investigating the break-in that he regretted his role.

He called the affair, quote, an unfortunate use of executive power and said he was sorry he did not have the wisdom to withdraw.

Mr. E. HOWARD HUNT (Former CIA Officer): I want to emphasize that at the time of the Watergate operation, I considered my participation as a duty to my country. I thought it was an unwise operation but I viewed it as lawful.

MONTAGNE: Hunt pleaded guilty to federal conspiracy charges, and he served nearly three years in prison. He died yesterday in Miami of complications from pneumonia. E. Howard Hunt was 88.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.