Dream Job Elusive for Most, Survey Finds

A survey of 6,000 fulltime workers, taken by the online job site CareerBuilder.com and The Walt Disney Company, finds that four out of five people say they are not in their dream job. On the positive side, police and firefighters are most likely to say they've got the ideal job, followed by teachers and real estate professionals.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And the last word in business is about finding your dream job - or not.

A survey finds that four out of five people say they are not in their dream job. It comes from online job site CareerBuilder.com and The Walt Disney Company. On the various professions, police and firefighters are most likely to say they've got the ideal job. Many real estate professionals say they've got a fantasy job. What about director of a national radio program? Ben Williamson, does it worked for you? He's like, maybe, maybe not.

When it comes to cities, Boston residents are most likely to say they've got the perfect kind of work. San Diego has the least number of perfectly-fulfilled workers. Only 7 percent say they've got the job of their dreams.

And this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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