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A Film Indebted to Government Lunacy

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A Film Indebted to Government Lunacy

Diversions

A Film Indebted to Government Lunacy

A Film Indebted to Government Lunacy

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In a new Japanese film, a government official tries to go back in time to save his country from a debt crisis. It's a comedy, complete with a sexy bar hostess who helps the bureaucrat reverse the clock by rewiring a washing machine.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

By now you may have received your December credit card statement, and if you're stunned by the consequences of your own holiday spending, if you wish you could go back and do things differently, then today's last word in business is for you.

A film producer in Japan had a similar idea. The plot of his movie involves a Japanese government official. He tries to go back in time to save his country from a debt crisis. He has limited time to convince policymakers not to implement policies that would lead near-economic meltdown.

This film is a comedy, and the bureaucrat is joined by a sexy bar hostess. The two reverse the clock using a time travel washing machine. Maybe you can rewire that overpriced videogame console to do the same thing.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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