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Using Particle Accelerators to Discover More About Matter

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Using Particle Accelerators to Discover More About Matter

Science

Using Particle Accelerators to Discover More About Matter

Using Particle Accelerators to Discover More About Matter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7039549/7039550" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Physics researchers are looking to the smallest of particles to try to answer some big questions about the universe, from why matter has mass, to whether string theory can truly explain the way the universe works.

Guests:

David Barney, outreach coordinator for the Compact Muon Solenoid; CERN, Geneva, Switzerland

Jacobo Konigsberg, professor, Department of Physics, University of Florida; spokesman for the Collider Detector at Fermilab, Batavia, Ill.

Barry Barish, director, Global Design Effort for the International Linear Collider Project; professor of high energy physics, emeritus, California Institute of Technology

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