Super Bowl Said to Penalize Worker Productivity

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One study says the days leading up to the Super Bowl create a lot of lost hours at work.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

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The Super Bowl is little more than a week away. 90 million people are expected to watch the game in the United States. And the financial benefits for players, advertisers and t-shirt manufacturers are expected to be huge. But the consulting firm Challenger, Grey and Christmas estimates that American businesses could lose $810 million in productivity over the next 10 days as employees talk about the game, plan Super Bowl parties, put down Super Bowl bets and call in sick the day after the game. So - you think Peyton can win the big one?

The firm says losses will be especially heavy in Chicago and Indianapolis, with the Bears and Colts playing in the Super Bowl. What do you think? Can the Bears' defense get to him? Now, I'm such suspicious of such surveys. Hey, will Grossman be on a roll? What a vapid stereotype of sports fans. You know, we just can't find enough material for our show this week so it has to be just an hour and 10 minutes long. Bear down.

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