NPR logo

the1shanti: 'In Here'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7060369/7060473" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
the1shanti: 'In Here'

the1shanti: 'In Here'

the1shanti: 'In Here'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7060369/7060473" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Indian hip-hop artist the1shanti, also known as India Bambaataa. hide caption

toggle caption

Indian hip-hop artist the1shanti, also known as India Bambaataa.

"Hip hop is my vocabulary," says North Carolina-born, Brooklyn-bred artist the1shanti, "and I get pretty talkative."

Rapper-producer the1shanti says he isn't concerned with whether his music will make top 10 lists. He's more concerned with whether or not it will last forever. That attitude, along with his self-proclaimed "undeniable talent" contributed to the Dum Dum Project's album, Spiritual Bling (Universal Music), with the international hit singles "Punjabi Five-0" and "Supafly Bindi".

The1shanti's work has garnered him the honorary title of "India Bambaataa" from hip hop's godfather, Afrika Bambaataa. As a child, the1shanti was a playground rhyme prodigy at the age of eight, and by 12 he made his debut on stage with Doug E. Fresh and Ultramagnetic MCs. Raised in a strict Hindu household, the1shanti says he felt the alienation of not "fitting in" with both mainstream American culture and his upbringing. Hip-hop offered a home.

The artist's debut album, India Bambaataa (Flatbush Junction), ranges from topics of social change and self-awareness to party-oriented selections for contemporary audiences.