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War Strains Family Life for Military Couples

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War Strains Family Life for Military Couples

U.S.

War Strains Family Life for Military Couples

War Strains Family Life for Military Couples

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Army Command Sgt. Maj. James Champaign and Sgt. Maj. Elizabeth Champaign are married. Between them, they've been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan six times since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Frank Morris hide caption

toggle caption Frank Morris

According to a number of commanders, there are more married U.S. military couples serving together in Iraq and Afghanistan than in any previous conflict.

The rules governing a couple's behavior are different from unit to unit. But all of these men and women face the same challenge: remaining a family during wartime.

Frank Morris of member station KCUR reports.

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