Looking for the Ark, and Finding Humanity For a fan of the movie Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark who is about to travel to Ethiopia, learning that the actual ark is believed to be in the country can bring on a state of excitement and anticipation. But on arrival, the hunger and poverty can overtake those interests.
NPR logo

Looking for the Ark, and Finding Humanity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7226711/7226714" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Looking for the Ark, and Finding Humanity

Looking for the Ark, and Finding Humanity

Looking for the Ark, and Finding Humanity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7226711/7226714" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Ark of the Covenant is said to rest in St. Mary Church of Zion in Axum, Ethiopia. Only a single monk is allowed to see the ark. hide caption

toggle caption

The Ark of the Covenant is said to rest in St. Mary Church of Zion in Axum, Ethiopia. Only a single monk is allowed to see the ark.

One of the orphans inside the St. Mary's compound. Jake Warga hide caption

toggle caption
Jake Warga

One of the orphans inside the St. Mary's compound.

Jake Warga

Steven Spielberg plans to begin filming the fourth installment of the Indiana Jones series this spring with Harrison Ford and Sean Connery. The first film, Raiders of the Lost Ark, came out in 1981, and it left a deep impression on independent producer Jake Warga.

While on a trip to Ethiopia, Warga dons his fedora, just like Indiana Jones, and goes in search of the lost Ark of the Covenant.

He discovers a few things along the way: that the ark's final resting spot isn't deep in a government warehouse, but in a church in a dusty Ethiopian city on the border with Eritrea, and that life isn't always as it is in films.