Apple's Jobs: Open Up the Online Music Market

Apple CEO Steve Jobs urges four big labels to sell songs online without using software that prevents consumers from making multiple copies. Jobs says the technology isn't working, and that selling music without restrictions would boost the market.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our business news starts with a radical new idea for the music industry.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: As the industry tries to figure out how to sell music and make money in the age of the Internet and the MP3 player, Steve Jobs has a shocking thought: stop using digital copyright protection.

In a statement on his company's Web site yesterday, the Apple CEO called on the four big record companies to start selling songs online without the software now used to prevent consumers from making multiple copies. Steve Jobs says the technology isn't working. He says selling music online without restrictions would boost the market.

But if that were to happen, his own company Apple will have to give up the anti-copying system now used on its iTunes music store.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.