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Apple's Jobs: Open Up the Online Music Market

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Apple's Jobs: Open Up the Online Music Market

Business

Apple's Jobs: Open Up the Online Music Market

Apple's Jobs: Open Up the Online Music Market

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7234987/7234989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Apple CEO Steve Jobs urges four big labels to sell songs online without using software that prevents consumers from making multiple copies. Jobs says the technology isn't working, and that selling music without restrictions would boost the market.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our business news starts with a radical new idea for the music industry.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: As the industry tries to figure out how to sell music and make money in the age of the Internet and the MP3 player, Steve Jobs has a shocking thought: stop using digital copyright protection.

In a statement on his company's Web site yesterday, the Apple CEO called on the four big record companies to start selling songs online without the software now used to prevent consumers from making multiple copies. Steve Jobs says the technology isn't working. He says selling music online without restrictions would boost the market.

But if that were to happen, his own company Apple will have to give up the anti-copying system now used on its iTunes music store.

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