Record Industry Responds to Jobs on Music Comments

Apple CEO Steve Jobs said this week that music sales might improve if the big music labels get rid of piracy-protection software. The Recording Industry Association of America has a prompt response, saying Apple should offer its own anti-piracy technology — now used on its iTunes music store — to rivals. That way, fans could play songs they buy from iTunes on any device, not just Apple's iPod.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Today's last work in business is about who gains from music sales. It's a response to yesterday's attention-grabbing statement by Steve Jobs, the CEO of Apple. Jobs suggests that music sales might improve if the big music labels got rid of piracy protection software.

The Recording Industry Association of America shot back with its own suggestion for boosting sales. It says, Apple should offer its own anti-piracy technology, which is now used just on its iTunes music store, to its rivals. That way, fans can play songs they buy from iTunes on any device and not just Apple's iPod. It's not clear if Apple will go along with that suggestion.

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