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Why People Probably Don't Understand Probability
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Why People Probably Don't Understand Probability

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Why People Probably Don't Understand Probability

Why People Probably Don't Understand Probability
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Robert Siegel talks with Columbia statistics professor Andrew Gelman. Gelman is the co-author of the book Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks, which includes an age-old statistics experiment that demonstrates how people misunderstand probability when it comes to the coin toss.

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