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The Juicy History of Blood Oranges

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The Juicy History of Blood Oranges

Food

The Juicy History of Blood Oranges

The Juicy History of Blood Oranges

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7344360/7344361" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Two of the main blood oranges grown in the United States: Spanish Sanguinelii (left) and Tarocco. Enlarge the image to see the Moro variety. David Karp hide caption

toggle caption David Karp

The main blood oranges grown in the United States: Spanish Sanguinelii (left), Tarocco and Moro.

David Karp

In 1646, a Jesuit scholar wrote of an orange with purple-colored flesh that tasted strangely like a grape. The mystery and drama of blood oranges has fascinated citrus lovers ever since.

Rare-fruit connoisseur David Karp talks about blood oranges with Debbie Elliott.

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