The Juicy History of Blood Oranges

Blood Oranges. Credit: David Karp. i i

Two of the main blood oranges grown in the United States: Spanish Sanguinelii (left) and Tarocco. Enlarge the image to see the Moro variety. David Karp hide caption

itoggle caption David Karp
Blood Oranges. Credit: David Karp.

The main blood oranges grown in the United States: Spanish Sanguinelii (left), Tarocco and Moro.

David Karp

In 1646, a Jesuit scholar wrote of an orange with purple-colored flesh that tasted strangely like a grape. The mystery and drama of blood oranges has fascinated citrus lovers ever since.

Rare-fruit connoisseur David Karp talks about blood oranges with Debbie Elliott.

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