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Scientists Weigh the Livability of Mars

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Scientists Weigh the Livability of Mars

Space

Scientists Weigh the Livability of Mars

Scientists Weigh the Livability of Mars

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7453410/7453414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Could there be another spot in the solar system that supports life — or did in the past? Many planetary scientists think that place is Mars. Broadcasting from the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, we discuss the search for life on Mars.

We hear how scientists are following the water and the energy, trying to target those parts of the planet most likely to harbor life. Plus, we learn how the rovers Spirit and Opportunity have changed our ideas about the Martian environment, and what evidence future missions will look for.

Guests:

David Des Marais, Long Term Planning Lead, Mars Exploration Rovers senior research scientist Astrobiology Program at the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

Michael Carr, planetary geologist; U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif.

Tori Hoehler, research scientist, Astrobiology Program at the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

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