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Using Digital Tools to Repair Analog Audio

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Using Digital Tools to Repair Analog Audio

Using Digital Tools to Repair Analog Audio

Using Digital Tools to Repair Analog Audio

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Robert Siegel talks to Jamie Howarth about the next step in audio restoration: ridding analog-era sound of its inevitable speed variations by writing software that virtually recreates the original device on which a recording was made from the existing tape.

The sound is then digitally fed back through that machine to correct the errors due to azimuth, capstan bumps, tension in reels, etc. To say the least, it's a complex algorithm.

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