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A Case of Classical Plagiarism?

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A Case of Classical Plagiarism?

Music

A Case of Classical Plagiarism?

A Case of Classical Plagiarism?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7551093/7551104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The late British pianist Joyce Hatto (center) and conductor Martin Fogel (left) with composer Walter Gaze Cooper, June 15, 1954. Fred Ramage/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Ramage/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

When pianist Joyce Hatto died last summer at the age of 77, her obituary in the Guardian was glowing with praise for her great talent.

Last week, high-tech analysis uncovered that her recordings may have been fakes.

Guests on the program discuss what's being called the Joyce Hatto hoax.

Guests:

James Inverne, editor of Gramophone Magazine

Andrew Rose, hired by Gramophone to examine the Joyce Hatto fakes

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