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'Sea Squirts' Slime Puget Sound

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'Sea Squirts' Slime Puget Sound

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'Sea Squirts' Slime Puget Sound

'Sea Squirts' Slime Puget Sound

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7602142/7602143" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tunicates, or "sea squirts," have the ability to spread rapidly. Georgia Arrow hide caption

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A slug-like creature is damaging the ecosystem of Puget Sound. The so-called "sea squirts" are multiplying like little underwater rabbits, starving out or smothering other sea life.

Host Luke Burbank speaks with marine educator Janna Nichols about the creatures.