The Case of the Tri-Tone Tea Kettle

We hear from listener Navah Langmeyer of Baltimore who submits the sound of her tea kettle — which plays three distinct notes.

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

A Chinese-made kitchen item found its way to one of our listeners, who submits it as today's sound clip.

Ms. NAVAH LANGMEYER (Mathematician): I'm Navah Langmeyer. I'm a mathematician. I live in Baltimore City, Maryland. My husband and I own a tea kettle which we received as a wedding gift back when we were in graduate school.

It's a beautiful kettle. It's a metallic blue and yellow and green and purple. A lot of teakettles have a harmonica reed as their whistle, and our tea kettle does that one better - it has a full harmonica chord as its whistle, a three-note chord.

(Soundbite of tri-tone teakettle whistling)

Ms. LANGMEYER: I'm a tea drinker. I hear this kettle on a regular basis, and it never fails to brighten my day a level. We've received a number of requests for information about the kettle, and I've looked on the Internet and I've looked in stores for other three-note teakettles, and I haven't been able to find one.

(Soundbite of tri-tone teakettle whistling)

NORRIS: A three-note teakettle, and its owner, Navah Langmeyer. You're invited to submit your own audio snapshot. Go to npr.org and search using the word soundclip to find out how.

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