Scientists Befuddled in Missing Teaspoon Caper A group of epidemiologists investigated the phenomenon of disappearing teaspoons in the workplace. They found that 80 percent of their office's teaspoons went missing in the course of the five-month study.
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Scientists Befuddled in Missing Teaspoon Caper

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Scientists Befuddled in Missing Teaspoon Caper

Scientists Befuddled in Missing Teaspoon Caper

Scientists Befuddled in Missing Teaspoon Caper

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/7673280/7673281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some groundbreaking scientific research takes a while to get the attention it deserves. That's the case for a study performed by a group of epidemiologists in Australia back in 2005. They investigated the phenomenon of disappearing teaspoons in the workplace.

The researchers found that 80 percent of their office's teaspoons went missing in the course of the five month study.

Michele Norris talks with one of the study's authors, Dr. Campbell Aitken. He says they never solved the mystery of who was taking the teaspoons.