Voices in the News A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: American historian Robert Dallek; Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.; unknown Alabama resident; unknown Alabama government official; President George W. Bush; Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Lee Hamilton, co-chair, Iraq Study Group; Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: American historian Robert Dallek; Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.; unknown Alabama resident; unknown Alabama government official; President George W. Bush; Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Lee Hamilton, co-chair, Iraq Study Group; Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).

LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. ROBERT DALLEK (Historian): What's so interesting about Schlesinger and makes him so unusual is generally there's a rule of thumb about historians; they don't write great books until they reach the age of 40, and Schlesinger was one of those who managed to do this, and it was at the beginning of a most impressive, extraordinary career.

Mr. ARTHUR M. SCHLESINGER, JR. (Historian): Well, I think a historian has his own discipline. But historians like everybody else are prisoners of their own experience. And they often read back into the past the preoccupations of the present.

Unidentified Woman #1 (Resident, Alabama): It got really black, really dark and I had my scanner on, my police scanner on, and I heard it when they said that it was headed toward our direction, and I ran into the bathroom with pillows and I stayed in there till I heard it go away.

Unidentified Woman #2 (Resident, Alabama): Right now we have nine fatalities as a result of the tornado. Of that nine, we have eight in Coffee County. But of course Coffee County is the county with Enterprise High School, and that's where we have the majority of the fatalities there.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: Tomorrow I'm going down to Georgia and Alabama. I go down with a heavy heart. I go down knowing full well that I'll be seeing people whose lives were turned upside down by the tornadoes.

Ms. CONDOLEEZZA RICE (U.S. Secretary of State): The government of Iraq is preparing for an expanded neighbors meeting, first at a sub-ministerial level, that will take place in Baghdad in the first half of March. I'm pleased that the government of Iraq is launching this new diplomatic initiative and that we will be able to support it and participate in it.

Mr. LEE HAMILTON (Co-Chair, Iraq Study Group): I think there was an internal debate within the administration over a period of months about whether or not to talk with these countries. Finally those who favored the talks prevailed.

Mr. ROBERT GATES (U.S. Secretary of Defense): Secretary of the Army Dr. Fran Harvey offered his resignation. I have accepted his resignation. I am disappointed that some in the Army have not adequately appreciated the seriousness of the situation pertaining to outpatient care at Walter Reed.

Senator JOHM McCAIN (Republican, Arizona): But you asked me if I would come back on this show.

Mr. DAVID LETTERMAN (Host, Late Show with David Letterman): Right.

Sen. McCAIN: If I was going to announce.

Mr. LETTERMAN: Yes.

Sen. McCAIN: I am announcing that I will be a candidate for president of the United States.

Mr. LETTERMAN: Oh.

(Soundbite of applause)

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