Bush Visit Prompts Protests in Brazil

President Bush and Brazilian President will promote an agreement that Bush says will boost alternative fuel production and wean U.S. cars from gasoline. But thousands of rotesters crowded the streets of Sao Paulo ahead of the Bush visit, protesting the deal.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

As soon as President Bush arrived in Brazil yesterday, the protesters were in Sao Paolo.

(Soundbite of drum-beating at protest)

INSKEEP: That's the sound of students, environmentalists, and left-leaning activists. Some were beaten by police and fired upon with tear gas. In another Brazilian city, protesters yelled, "Get out, Imperialist." Such protesters may not like the agreement the president is promoting today. Mister Bush will visit a gas station with Brazil's president and promote a plan to boost ethanol production. The fuel made from plants could reduce U.S. dependence on oil. A lot of it comes from Brazil. But environmentalists contend it could also encourage more clearing of the Amazon rainforest.

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