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TV Anchor Wants Starbucks Out of Forbidden City

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TV Anchor Wants Starbucks Out of Forbidden City

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TV Anchor Wants Starbucks Out of Forbidden City

TV Anchor Wants Starbucks Out of Forbidden City

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A tourist carries a coffee cup outside the Starbucks coffee shop in Beijing's Forbidden City, Jan. 19, 2007. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

A tourist carries a coffee cup outside the Starbucks coffee shop in Beijing's Forbidden City, Jan. 19, 2007.

Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

Starbucks coffee shops are seemingly everywhere, including China's Forbidden City, the ancient home of Chinese emperors. Rui Chenggang, a Chinese TV anchor, tells Steve Inskeep the coffee shop does not belong in the country's most-prized tourist site.