NPR logo Voters Speak: Voices from the March 4 Primaries

Election 2008

Voters Speak: Voices from the March 4 Primaries

Voters in four states headed to the polls Tuesday in large numbers, knowing that the results could be pivotal in both the Democratic and Republican presidential races.

NPR asked voters in three of the states — Ohio, Texas and Vermont — which candidate they supported and why. Voters also went to the polls in Rhode Island.

Ben Reavis

Ben Reavis
Nishant Dahiya, NPR

Ben Reavis, Dallas, Texas

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Reavis typically votes for Republicans but has opted to support a Democrat in this primary. He likes both McCain and Obama, he says, because neither falls in line with his party's views.

Daryl Manning

Daryl Manning
David Barnett, For NPR

Daryl Manning, Cleveland, Ohio

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Manning is registered as a Democrat and says he wants a candidate to focus on the economy and education. In this primary, he supported the candidate who he thought most represented change. He says the country has had enough of the Bushes and Clintons.

Ruth and John Ziske

Ziske
Ross Sneyd, For NPR

Ruth and John Ziske, Barre, Vermont

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The Ziskes voted Republican. They told NPR they wanted someone with experience — both as a politician and in Washington, D.C. They also said they believe the Republicans have better ideas than the Democrats.

Wayne Garcia

Wayne Garcia
Nishant Dahiya, NPR

Wayne Garcia, Dallas, Texas

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Like many voters, Wayne Garcia says he is looking for change. For him, that would mean voting a woman into the White House.

Beth Walter

Beth Walter
Terry Gildea, For NPR

Beth Walter, San Antonio, Texas

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Beth Walters is pleased by both Democratic candidates. As a physician, she says, she is particularly interested in the candidates' universal health care plans.

Roy Metcalf

Roy MetCalf
Nishant Dahiya, NPR

Roy Metcalf, Dallas, Texas

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Roy Metcalf voted Democratic because he wants to see a change in Washington. He says he feels disillusioned with politics now and does not want to elect another political insider.

Noreen Jones

Noreen Jones
David Barnett, For NPR

Noreen Jones, Cleveland, Ohio

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Jones says she feels energized by this primary and that every vote counts. Issues such as the economy and education lead her to support New York Sen. Hillary Clinton.

Linda Champany

Linda
Ross Sneyd, For NPR

Linda Champany, Barre, Vermont

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Champany identifies herself as a Christian and says she wants to elect a politician who will bring godly principles back to the country.

Jeff Harwell

Jeff Harwell
Nishant Dahiya, NPR

Jeff Harwell, Dallas, Texas

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Harwell is a Republican, who voted in the Democratic primary because he would rather see Arizona Sen. John McCain run against New York Sen. Hillary Clinton.

Aladin Gohar

Aladin Gohar, Columbus, Ohio

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Gohar is registered as an independent but voted Democratic in this primary. He wants change, particularly with regard to the war, and says he likes Obama's message of hope.

Donna Barron

Donna Barron, San Antonio, Texas

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Donna Barron describes herself as a military brat who wants a candidate who is strong on foreign policy, including the Iraq war and Afghanistan.

Reporting done by David C. Barnett, Nishant Dahiya, Terry Gildea, Ross Sneyd and Evie Stone. Produced by Nancy Cook, Josh Figueira and Laurel Wamsley.