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Top of the News

Top of the News

Top of the News

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The latest headlines.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Welcome back to THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News. We're on digital, FM, satellite and online at npr.org/bryantpark.

Hey, I'm Rachel Martin.

ALISON STEWART, host:

And I'm Alison Stewart.

Coming up: 27-year-old Casey Wilson has made it all the way to NBC. A talk with the newest member of "Saturday Night Live." But first, lets get some news headlines.

BILL WOLFF (Announcer): This is NPR.

MARTIN: Thanks, Alison.

GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul may be ending his bid for the presidency. In a video posted on his Web site yesterday, Paul hinted to his supporters that he could be dropping out of the race. He said although victory in the conventional political sense is not available in this particular race, many victories have been achieved through the hard work of his supporters. Republican frontrunner John McCain already has enough delegates to clinch the party's nomination and earlier this week, he's closet challenger, Mike Huckabee, conceded defeat.

The U.S. Senate has approved a measure to overhaul the country's consumer product laws and the agency that implements them. The bill would create a public database of complaints about products and empower state prosecutors to act if they think the federal government isn't doing enough to protect consumers. It also calls for increasing the staff and budget of the consumer products safety commission. Consumer groups have criticized the house bill saying it doesn't go far enough to protect consumers.

And some news closer to home. For nearly a decade, Ken Stern was part of an executive team that led to many successes for National Public Radio. But the network's board has ousted the CEO after less than a year and a half in the job. And NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik has more.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK: Ken Stern started as chief operating officer in 1999 and succeeded his mentor, Kevin Klose, in Fall 2006. The two men put NPR squarely in the black financially, an important step for the often shaky company. So there're now new facilities, new shows, new cadres of reporters and producers and a major expansion of NPR's digital offerings.

But Stern lacks the light tough of his predecessor and current and former public radio officials say Stern failed to convince the board where local stations fit into the digital age, when listeners can bypass old fashioned FM stations.

Board Chairman Dennis Haarsager says the board is seeking up media visionary of national stature. He's stepping down as chairman to serve as NPR's interim CEO until a new one is picked.

MARTIN: That was NPR's David Folkenflik reporting.

And that is the news. You can find it always online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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