NPR logo

Cemetery Space a Grave Issue for French Town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/88008112/87824483" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Cemetery Space a Grave Issue for French Town

Diversions

Cemetery Space a Grave Issue for French Town

Cemetery Space a Grave Issue for French Town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/88008112/87824483" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mayor of a French town called Sarpourenx has issued a blunt edict: Don't die. There is no room left in the town's cemetery.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

The mayor of a town called Sarpourenx, a village in Bordeaux, France has issued a blunt edict to townspeople; don't die. There's just no more room left in the town's cemetery. The town tried to expand the cemetery by purchasing some adjoining land, but an administrative court wouldn't permit the sale so 260 residents are left with no place to turn up their toes, if you please. Mayor Gerard Lalanne posted an ordinance in the town council office saying, quote, "All persons not having a plot in the cemetery and wishing to be buried are forbidden from dying in the parish."

Reuters news agency reports that a sentence added, offenders will be severely punished. Well obviously not with the death penalty. So how do you punish postmortem Frenchmen in Bordeaux? Maybe by serving a California merlot at their funeral, wherever that is.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.