NPR logo

With Nation Panicked, FDR Called for Bank Holiday

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/88019870/88019845" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
With Nation Panicked, FDR Called for Bank Holiday

U.S.

With Nation Panicked, FDR Called for Bank Holiday

With Nation Panicked, FDR Called for Bank Holiday

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/88019870/88019845" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Financial security for all Americans was weighing heavily on President Franklin Delano Roosevelt 75 years ago. On March 12, 1933, FDR delivered the first of what would become his famous "fireside chats," designed to reassure an anxious public struggling to find its way out of the Great Depression. He spoke after proclaiming a four-day bank holiday to prevent panicked customers from making huge withdrawals.