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Geeks Mourn the Loss of D&D Creator Gary Gygax
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Geeks Mourn the Loss of D&D Creator Gary Gygax

Geeks Mourn the Loss of D&D Creator Gary Gygax

Geeks Mourn the Loss of D&D Creator Gary Gygax
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Adam Rogers, senior editor of Wired magazine, talks about his recent op-ed, "Geek Love," in which he remembers Gary Gygax, creator of the roleplaying game Dungeons & Dragons.

He writes, "Mr. Gygax's game allowed geeks to venture out of our dungeons, blinking against the light, just in time to create the present age of electronic miracles."

Rogers' op-ed appeared Monday in The New York Times.

Gygax, 'Dungeons and Dragons' Co-Creator, Dies

Gygax, 'Dungeons and Dragons' Co-Creator, Dies
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With co-creator Dave Arneson, E. Gary Gygax developed Dungeons & Dragons in 1974.

With co-creator Dave Arneson, E. Gary Gygax developed Dungeons & Dragons in 1974 using medieval characters and mythical creatures. Gygax died Monday at age 69. AP/Family photo hide caption

toggle caption AP/Family photo

Imagine a mournful horn echoing across thousands of fantasy worlds: E. Gary Gygax, the co-creator of the role-playing game Dungeons and Dragons, died Wednesday morning. He was 69.

Gary Gygax was an icon to fans of the game, many of whom would show up at his home in Lake Geneva, Wis.

What began as a fantasy game published in book form in the early 1970s, eventually morphed and tumbled onto kitchen tables and dorm room floors. Players assumed the character of elves and dwarves, magicians and swordsmen, and confronted the primal conflict between good and evil.

"D&D," as fans call it, is the granddaddy of popular online games that attract hundreds of thousands of gamers to the Internet today.

Stephen Chenault, owner of Troll Lord Games, was a close friend of Gary Gygax. He talks to Melissa Block about Gygax and the beloved game he helped create.

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