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YouTube Awards: 'Chocolate Rain,' Giggling Baby

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YouTube Awards: 'Chocolate Rain,' Giggling Baby

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YouTube Awards: 'Chocolate Rain,' Giggling Baby

YouTube Awards: 'Chocolate Rain,' Giggling Baby

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The YouTube Awards lack a Red Carpet and glamour, but what an audience! This year's winner for Best Music Video was an unknown baritone — until he got 15 million hits for his song "Chocolate Rain." The award for Most Adorable went to a baby giggling hysterically at ripped pieces of paper. Among those that didn't win: Barack Obama's No. 1 fan, Obama Girl — despite the fact that Obama's speech is currently the most viewed video on YouTube.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

The YouTube Awards lack the red carpet and glamour, but what an audience. This year's winner for Best Music Video was an unknown baritone until he got 15 million hits for his song "Chocolate Rain." The award for Most Adorable went to a baby giggling hysterically while ripping pieces of paper. Among those that didn't win: Barack Obama's number one fan, Obama Girl — despite the fact that Obama's speech is currently the most viewed video on YouTube.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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