Homework: Weather Change

For last week's homework segment, we asked listeners to take a favorite line about the weather and adapt it for the modern age. Climate change was the overwhelming theme among the submissions we got. For next week, tell us about the craziest thing that ever turned up while you were spring cleaning.

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ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Andrea Seabrook.

For last week's homework assignment, we asked listeners to take a favorite line about the weather and adapt it for the modern age.

Mr. RUSS WEISS(ph) (Listener, Buffalo, New York): Well, when I lived in Buffalo, if someone complained about the weather, the customary response would be: Don't like it? Wait five minutes, and it'll change.

SEABROOK: That's listener Russ Weiss. He explained that the wind off Lake Erie could turn a mild winter's day into a freak blizzard without warning.

Mr. WEISS: Now in an age of intensifying global warming, I think I'd update that weather proverb to: Don't like it? Wait five decades, and it'll be really lousy.

SEABROOK: Climate change was the big theme among the submissions we got. David Daniels(ph) took a quote from novelist Charles Dudley Warner and gave it a twist. Everyone complains about the weather, but nobody does anything about it. Well, how about that? Maybe we are.

And although Garrison Keillor did not write to us this week - too bad - we thought we'd end with an observation of his from "Lake Wobegon": God created March to show people who don't drink what a hangover feels like.

(Soundbite of music)

SEABROOK: Now that spring has sprung, good people everywhere have begun dusting the blinds and clearing out the attic. All of this leads us to next week's assignment. Tell us about the craziest thing that ever turned up while you were spring cleaning: priceless paintings, long-lost letters, dead animals? Send your story to Homework at npr.org or call our Homework hotline at 202-408-5183. Please include your name and a number where we can reach you.

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