How the Markets Decide the Value of Stocks Investment bank JP Morgan offered to buy struggling Bear Stearns last week for $2 a share. But just before the offer, the shares were worth $60 a pop. We examine where these numbers come from.
NPR logo

How the Markets Decide the Value of Stocks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89149583/89149571" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
How the Markets Decide the Value of Stocks

How the Markets Decide the Value of Stocks

How the Markets Decide the Value of Stocks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89149583/89149571" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Investment bank JP Morgan offered to buy struggling Bear Stearns last week for $2 a share. But just before the offer, the shares were worth $60 a pop. Alex Chadwick talks to Dan Gross, senior editor of Newsweek, about how the markets come up with these numbers.