Coming Soon: A Chat with Maya Angelou

Lynn Neary previews her upcoming conversation with poet Maya Angelou. The interview is scheduled to air on Weekend Edition Sunday on April 6.

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Next Sunday on WEEKEND EDITION, an interview with Maya Angelou, who celebrates her 80th birthday on April 4. Though she's now as an acclaimed writer, Angelou started out as an entertainer.

Ms. MAYA ANGELOU (Writer): I can sing somewhat but I used to really be a dancer. And the only two things I ever loved was dancing and writing. And I could sing somewhat. I'm not being coy. I have no coyness or modesty, so I was never a good singer. I was known as Miss Calypso. And when I'd forget the lyric, I'd just tell the audience, I seem to have forgotten the lyric; I will now dance. And I would move around a bit.

HANSEN: Maya Angelou still writes and she'll speak with Lynn Neary next Sunday. I will be in Egypt with a crew from WEEKEND EDITION. When we return to Washington, you'll hear our climate change reports from Cairo, Alexandria, the Nile, as well as a story about a desert monastery and the life story of a woman known as the voice of Egypt, Umm Kulthum.

(Soundbite of music)

Ms. UMM KULTHUM (Singer): (Singing) (Speaking in foreign language)

HANSEN: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Liane Hansen.

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