NPR logo

Cyclist's Little-Known, But 'Major' Contribution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89273308/89273295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Cyclist's Little-Known, But 'Major' Contribution

Books

Cyclist's Little-Known, But 'Major' Contribution

Cyclist's Little-Known, But 'Major' Contribution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89273308/89273295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Conventional sports history has it that boxer Jack Johnson was the first, great African-American athlete.

But that distinction might go to Marshall Walter Taylor — better known as "Major" Taylor, an international cycling champion.

NPR's Tony Cox talks with cycling enthusiast Todd Balf, author of the book, Major: A Black Athlete, a White Era, and the Fight to Be the World's Fastest Human Being.

Books Featured In This Story

Major

A Black Athlete, a White Era, and the Fight to Be the World's Fastest Human Being

by Todd Balf

Hardcover, 306 pages |

purchase

Buy Featured Book

Title
Major
Subtitle
A Black Athlete, a White Era, and the Fight to Be the World's Fastest Human Being
Author
Todd Balf

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?