Helping Black Women Recognize, Treat Fibroids Eighty percent of black women will develop benign uterine fibroid tumors by their late 40s, says the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dr. Elizabeth Stewart talks with Farai Chideya about the extraordinary prevalence of uterine fibroids in black women.
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Helping Black Women Recognize, Treat Fibroids

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Helping Black Women Recognize, Treat Fibroids

Helping Black Women Recognize, Treat Fibroids

Helping Black Women Recognize, Treat Fibroids

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89344394/89344373" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eighty percent of black women will develop benign uterine fibroid tumors by their late 40s, according to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Dr. Elizabeth Stewart is a leading researcher in the area of women's health.

She talks with Farai Chideya about the extraordinary prevalence of uterine fibroids in black women.