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Letters

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Letters

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Letters

Letters

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NPR's Susan Stamberg reads letters from listeners. Many wrote in to complain about Martin Kaste's recent reporter's notebook on the challenges of reporting from Native American lands. Others wrote to share their own fond memories of the Bob and Ray radio duo, after hearing our interview with Bob Elliott.

SUSAN STAMBERG, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Susan Stamberg.

Time for your letters.

(Soundbite of typing and chimes)

STAMBERG: Martin Kaste's Reporter's Notebook two weeks ago about challenges in reporting from Native American lands drew sharp criticism from many of you. Listeners complained that Kaste's remark about being scolded by a tribal elder for interrupting him was followed by a voiceover as the elder prayed. Jessica Tracy of Los Angeles wrote, you concluded your piece with the insight that sometimes you just have to shut up and listen, which is precisely what you did not do. As your subject sings his prayer, you talk over him the entire time and wonder how long this is going to go on. I was stunned by your rudeness and disrespect.

John Oroark(ph) in Decatur, Illinois was glad to hear Bob Elliott of the comedy team Bob and Ray on the air again. He writes, I found them one evening on WCBS radio in the fall of 1959. My mother made me do my homework by promising that I could listen to those funny guys with all the voices. It worked. Mr. Oroark's favorite Bob and Ray routine was Mary Backstage, Noble Wife. Others would chose this one:

(Soundbite of Bob and Ray Routine)

BOB AND RAY ROUTINE: I am president…

(Soundbite of laughter)

BOB AND RAY ROUTINE: …and secretary…

(Soundbite of laughter)

BOB AND RAY ROUTINE: …of the slow…

(Soundbite of laughter)

BOB AND RAY ROUTINE: …talkers…

STAMBERG: Oh, hurry up, please.

BOB AND RAY ROUTINE: …of America.

(Soundbite of laughter and applause)

BOB AND RAY ROUTINE: …of America.

STAMBERG: Finally my essay on the arrival of spring in Washington led Lynn Spatz(ph) to write that she knows it's spring because of new baby calves, quote, "We start calving on our farm in northeast Nebraska in early March. Sometimes they are born in snow and cold, but it's still spring. On the warm sunny days they stretch out and nap or exercise their legs by running as fast as they can with reckless abandon. Now that's spring."

Thanks, everybody, for getting in touch. Keep it up. Our Web site is npr.org and then click on contact us.

(Soundbite of music)

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