A Man Hit Five Times by Meteorites

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News worth and honorable mention, including the Bosnian villager who blames aliens for the bad luck he's had since November.

ALISON STEWART, host:

Hey, thanks for spending part of your day with the Bryant Park Project from NPR News. We are online all the time at npr.org/bryantpark. I'm Alison Stewart, along with Rachel Martin.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Hello.

STEWART: And so much news today. President going to announce a reduction time for troops, talking about all those cancelled flights, so much Olympic torch drama, but did you hear the one about the man's house that was hit by a meteorite five times? No? Well, then you need the Ramble!

MARTIN: We are going to start the Ramble off with some Italian flavor. I don't know what kind of accent that was. Italian politician...

STEWART: It was an Italian-flavored accent.

MARTIN: Italian-flavored accent. It's like Kazakh and Italian. Silvio Berlusconi, remember, him, he used to be the prime minister. He claims women of the right wing in the political spectrum in Italy are more beautiful than those on the left. Or actually, the exact thing he said was, they are less ugly than those on the left. Saying the left has no taste, even when it comes to women.

STEWART: Did he really say that?

MARTIN: He really said it. I mean, he really didn't say they were more beautiful. He said they were less ugly. The left has uglier women, which is a very interesting way to come at that whole issue. Berlusconi is running for prime minister of Italy. It is a position he's held twice before.

I don't know, does he think this is going to get him more votes? I don't know. His political opponents are responding to his remarks about their taste in women by accusing him of being sexist. Berlusconi has said he'd name at least four women in his cabinet if he's elected prime minister.

STEWART: Good looking ones, though.

MARTIN: No word on exactly their physical kind of presentation. Foot note, last year Berlusconi's wife accused him of flirting with other women, and demanded a public apology. That apology went like this, quote, "Forgive me, I beg you, and take this public display of my private pride giving into your fury as an act of love. One of many."

STEWART: All righty then. Music please.

(Soundbite of song "American Idol Theme")

STEWART: Last night on "American Idol," everybody, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown!

(Soundbite of show "American Idol")

Prime Minister GORDON BROWN (England): Good evening from Downing Street in London. All year on "Idol," it's the talent of the American people we admire. Tonight, it's your generosity.

STEWART: That was just odd.

MARTIN: It was so odd.

STEWART: So odd. Gordon Brown just standing there.

MARTIN: He was really smiley, like someone told him, listen, this is a young people's show. You need to look young and happy.

STEWART: Well, instead of having the regular talent competition last night, it was a thing called "Idol Gives Back." It was a special charity edition telethon of the FOX show. Huge celebrities on hand, Bono, Mariah Carey, Miley Cyrus, Reese Witherspoon, and basically it was a telethon where you could call in and donate money to a series, a variety of different organizations.

The reason that Gordon Brown was on it, he went on to say that the U.K. was going to pay for 20 million mosquito nets to fight Malaria. That should run Britain about 200 million dollars. OK, so we have the big celebrities - Bono, Mariah Carey, the prime minister of the U.K., and then we were supposed to have the presidential candidates with taped speeches. Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, John McCain.

MARTIN: What happened?

STEWART: The show went long. Presidential candidates got bumped. Miley Cyrus made it. The three senators, not so much.

MARTIN: Well, probably they couldn't just bump one. They were like, well, we're too long. We've got to take them all off.

STEWART: So, their appeals will be seen on tonight's show instead. Alessandra Stanley wrote in the New York Times this morning, "'Idol Gives Back' would have given the politicians an opportunity to link themselves to the strong allure of several celebrities and their high wattage charitable causes. But 'American Idol' producers evidently felt the candidates didn't have the same cache." Ouch.

MARTIN: So, Ali, have you ever had one of those days when you just feel like someone is out to get you? Something in - the stars are not aligned, the universe has bad things in store for you, you don't know what you did wrong, but someone wants bad things to happen to you? Well, there's a guy in Bosnia who says that it's actual aliens. This is from a story in the Daily Mail of London. He really fears that aliens are targeting him, and he's really got some evidence, actually. His home has been hit by five meteorites since last November.

Experts at Belgrade University have confirmed that the rocks were indeed meteorites, and are now looking at magnetic fields in the area around the man's home to figure out what's going on. I mean, the odds of that happening, I have to imagine, are pretty slim. So, the man says, I am obviously being targeted by extra terrestrials. I don't know what I have done to annoy them. Poor guy.

STEWART: Oh, no.

MARTIN: I know. Hey, folks. That's your Ramble. These stories and more on our website, npr.org/bryantpark.

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