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Letters: Airline Industry Woes; Civil Disobedience

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Letters: Airline Industry Woes; Civil Disobedience

From Our Listeners

Letters: Airline Industry Woes; Civil Disobedience

Letters: Airline Industry Woes; Civil Disobedience

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Listeners find fault with both the FAA and American Airlines for their roles in the latest crisis plaguing the ailing airline industry. Also, one listener praises ex-Navy lawyer Matthew Diaz's decision to leak the names of prisoners being held at Guantanamo in 2005.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Now, your e-mail. Yesterday we reported on the cancellation of hundreds of American Airlines flights by the FAA. The industry isn't happy.

Mr. MIKE BOYD (Aviation Analyst, The Boyd Group, Inc.): There isn't an airplane flying that was designed for $100 a barrel of oil. So they've got to work on getting revenues up and cost down. And this FAA stunt does just the opposite.

SIEGEL: That's aviation consultant Mike Boyd. What a blind spot on your coverage, writes Eric Mathis(ph) of Chula Vista, California. NPR makes it sound like the big bad FAA is picking on American, instead of American forgetting(ph) to do their job and getting caught. Gabe Ramirez(ph) of Los Angeles asks, why is it American Airlines always manages to find itself in crisis mode? The FAA should not shoulder the blame for insisting that American's old fleet be fit for service.

And finally, we received a number of messages about my interview with former Navy lawyer Matthew Diaz. In 2005, Diaz leaked the names of prisoners being held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He was sent to the brig for six months, but says he now lives comfortably with his actions. I couldn't help thinking about Henry David Thoreau's essay, "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience," writes Deborah Gatner(ph) of Greeley, Colorado. Just as Thoreau argued for the importance of each person following his or her conscience regardless of the consequences, Matthew Diaz acted according to his conscience in naming the prisoners. I found myself cheering as I listened to him speak.

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